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Recovery Time After Accessory Navicular Surgery


Overview
Not everyone has the same number of bones in his feet. It is not uncommon for both the hands and the feet to contain extra small accessory bones, or ossicles, that sometimes cause problems. This guide will help you understand where the accessory navicular is located, why the extra bone can cause problems and How can you get taller in a week? doctors treat the condition.

Accessory Navicular

Causes
This painful foot condition is caused by an extra bone in the foot called the accessory navicular. Only about 10% of people have this bone (4 to 21%), and not all of them will develop any symptoms. The navicular bone is one of the normal tarsal bones of the foot. It is located on the inside of the foot, at the arch.

Symptoms
The main symptom of an aggravated accessory navicular is pain, particularly in the instep. Walking can sometimes be difficult, and tight shoes may worsen the condition.

Diagnosis
To diagnose accessory navicular syndrome, the foot and ankle surgeon will ask about symptoms and examine the foot, looking for skin irritation or swelling. The doctor may press on the bony prominence to assess the area for discomfort. Foot structure, muscle strength, joint motion, and the way the patient walks may also be evaluated. X-rays are usually ordered to confirm the diagnosis. If there is ongoing pain or inflammation, an MRI or other advanced imaging tests may be used to further evaluate the condition.

Non Surgical Treatment
For less severe symptoms, decreasing or modifying activity, such as avoiding aggravating activities, may suffice. Ice and NSAIDS can be used to help control pain. An arch support or an orthotics may help to stabilize the arch during this time. When rubbing on the bump causes pain, a doughnut pad can be worn. Exercises to increase range of motion and improve movement should still be used.

Accessory Navicular

Surgical Treatment
If non-surgical treatment fails to relieve the symptoms of accessory navicular syndrome, surgery may be appropriate. Surgery may involve removing the accessory bone, reshaping the area, and repairing the posterior tibial tendon to improve its function. This extra bone is not needed for normal foot function.

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